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Clinical Practice

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Above: Manchester, UK

For those who picked up on the first post I hope that you took the time to go on to Sarah Knowles second and third posts on the topic. If not, then here are the links…

‘Science vs The Gap’

https://datapatientaction.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/three-cheers-for-implementation-science-2-science-vs-the-gap/

and, ‘You Make Me Want to be a Better Researcher’

https://datapatientaction.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/three-cheers-for-implementation-science-3-you-make-me-want-to-be-a-better-researcher/

Worth a read. I was lucky to meet Sarah and other members of the Greater Manchester NIHR CLAHRC on a visit last year. Sarah is a proper implementation scientist – I am not!

These posts are good for the uninitiated (i.e. those people who are thinking ‘what is implementation science anyway?’) and those wondering why I’m posting about it.

My favourite is Cheer #3 – probably the least well recognised and understood but for me the most important because it emphasises the two-way connection that should exist between clinical research and implementation science. It’s what takes implementation science from being an academic curiosity to a ‘thing’ that clinician scientists benefit from understanding and engaging with.

 

Having read some other comparable blog posts of late, and written at least one piece for another site I’m encouraged to try and resuscitate this site.

The nature of the posts will need to change. Time is never plentiful and it is a challenge at the best of the times to be able to spend it writing original material.

So the long, rambling posts will likely be a thing of the past to be replace more than likely with links to material elsewhere that I have either contributed to or fit broadly into themes or areas of interest.

But fundamentally the original goals and intentions of The Last General Cardiologist will remain (and I’m yet to be convinced that the title isn’t appropriate…

Clinical redesign based upon our recent research has been a critical part of the Emergency Cardiology Groups work. Read about the ACRE project here…

The Emergency Cardiology Group

The Accelerated Chest Pain Risk Evaluation (ACRE) project is a statewide project supported by the Queensland Health Clinical Access and Redesign Unit (CARU) under the Health Innovation Fund (HIF).
When complete, the project has the potential to impact the care of up to 15,000 patients per year across Queensland, with potential estimated savings of approximately $21 million per year.
Translating research findings into practice, the project has already made rapid improvements in the assessment process of patients presenting with chest pain to Queensland emergency departments.

Find out more about the ACRE project here…

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The bibliography has been updated over at the ECG blog…

The Emergency Cardiology Group

… was to get the bibliography up to date!

The links go to the full article where possible, but some of these remain behind paywalls.

For individual reprint requests for academic/educational use please leave a message and we will provide these wherever possible according to copyright restrictions.

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The Emergency Cardiology Group

The ACRE project was featured on the ABC radio AM news and current affairs programme this morning.

You can listen to the story featuring interviews with Will Parsonage and Terry George from Nambour Hospital here.

Nambour was where the ACRE project pilot was rolled out and the results of the pilot project have been published here.

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