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Above: Manchester, UK

For those who picked up on the first post I hope that you took the time to go on to Sarah Knowles second and third posts on the topic. If not, then here are the links…

‘Science vs The Gap’

https://datapatientaction.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/three-cheers-for-implementation-science-2-science-vs-the-gap/

and, ‘You Make Me Want to be a Better Researcher’

https://datapatientaction.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/three-cheers-for-implementation-science-3-you-make-me-want-to-be-a-better-researcher/

Worth a read. I was lucky to meet Sarah and other members of the Greater Manchester NIHR CLAHRC on a visit last year. Sarah is a proper implementation scientist – I am not!

These posts are good for the uninitiated (i.e. those people who are thinking ‘what is implementation science anyway?’) and those wondering why I’m posting about it.

My favourite is Cheer #3 – probably the least well recognised and understood but for me the most important because it emphasises the two-way connection that should exist between clinical research and implementation science. It’s what takes implementation science from being an academic curiosity to a ‘thing’ that clinician scientists benefit from understanding and engaging with.

 

The last couple of years have been busy and seen change. In the true spirit of ‘generalism’ I now have three jobs.

My practice,

My public practice, and

A university position…

The latter, as the Clinical Director, of The Australian Centre for Health Service Innovation (AusHSI) is perhaps the biggest diversion from my work as a cardiologist but sits squarely within the direction of my research work and has offered fascinating opportunities I had never expected. Read more about AusHSI here, and visit the AusHSI Blog here.

In addition to this has been growing responsibilities with the Cardiac Society (CSANZ) and editorial duties at Heart, Lung and Circulation.

Hence the difficulty finding time for the blog…

Having read some other comparable blog posts of late, and written at least one piece for another site I’m encouraged to try and resuscitate this site.

The nature of the posts will need to change. Time is never plentiful and it is a challenge at the best of the times to be able to spend it writing original material.

So the long, rambling posts will likely be a thing of the past to be replace more than likely with links to material elsewhere that I have either contributed to or fit broadly into themes or areas of interest.

But fundamentally the original goals and intentions of The Last General Cardiologist will remain (and I’m yet to be convinced that the title isn’t appropriate…

The Emergency Cardiology Group

Will Parsonage writes…Next week I’ll be presenting on some of our clinical redesign work at this meeting under the title ‘NEATs, SLICs and ACREs’. It is a great opportunity to present to a much wider audience on the rationale, method and outcome of the project we have been conducting with the team at Nambour Hospital to translate our research into practice around patients presenting to emergency departments with chest pain.

The full program for the meeting is here.

I will post a copy of the presentation here following the meeting or for more information please contact me through the blog.

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This sort of thing has been bugging me for ages…

Old CardioBrief

Don’t believe the the hype! That’s the cardinal rule to obey when reading health news. “Breakthroughs” and “cures” are rare, and should always be viewed with caution and skepticism.

This week was a great example. Last Sunday, the New York Times, the major networks, and a host of other media outlets (including this one) reported on a paper in  Nature Medicine about the discovery of a novel and potentially significant pathway linking red meat to heart disease. Briefly, the research suggested that carnitine, which is found naturally in high concentrations in red meat, can lead to atherosclerosis when it is converted by gut bacteria to a chemical called TMAO. Almost immediately I received a lot of comment from experts who raised serious questions about the research. Then today, a separate study was published with an entirely different perspective on carnitine. Although the two studies don’t directly contradict each other, they…

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Things don’t always get the attention they deserve…

Duchamp's FountainOne of the triumphs of the recent ACC 2013 meeting was the the host city of San Francisco and the meeting venue, the Moscone Centre, which is central to downtown San Francisco and it’s associated attractions. One of the notable attractions is the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) right next door to Moscone. In a spare couple of hours during the meeting it was great to be able to call in there for some diversion.

There I was delighted to find one of the replicas of Duchamp’s 1917 work ‘Fountain’ pictured above. If it looks like a urinal that’s because that is what it was. This is no ordinary urinal but one that in 2004 was voted one of the most influential modern art works of all time (and therefore possibly one of the most important works in the MoMA). Duchamp’s 1917 original was lost but celebrated by a series of replicas – this one, in the MoMA quietly celebrating the 50th anniversary of its creation in 1963. Unceremoniously placed on a non-descript, plain white plinth garners a level of inattention that I am sure the artist would perhaps have appreciated. I took the short movie below to illustrate this (you can see ‘Fountain’ centre frame on the white box).

It was in no way my intention, but a matter of fact, that I didn’t attend any of the late breaking clinical trial sessions at the recent ACC meeting. In fact, I admit to taking at least 24 hours to figure out what an LBCT actually was (a new mode of cardiac imaging that had passed me by?).

I enjoyed blogging some of the less travelled sessions of the meeting (Day 1, Day 2, Day 3). So I feel I did my bit for some of the things that don’t get the attention they deserve but for those in need of a good summary of the headline trials, that did garner most of the attention, here are a few suggestions.

Here is perhaps the definitive video summary of the key trials from the heart.org’s Cardiology Show

...and here a more personal view from Melissa Walton-Shirleys “Heartfelt’ blog, also on the heart.org

…and in a slightly different format a slideshow of the key findings of the major trials that were presented at the meeting.

Plenty to be getting on with there…